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1831 . MASCOUTAH » 1937 



"As Time Goes On 



5 ? 



WRITTEN • DESIGNED • DIRECTED 
BY W ILLARD FR-IEDERICH 



Mascoutah Public School Grounds 
August 8th and 9th, 1937 



REV. A. W. HOELSCHER J. D. MOLLMAN 

Pageant Chairman Chm. Centennial Committee 



IHANK YOU 



The Centennial Commission wishes to extend its warmest apprecia- 
tion to all those loyal citizens who in any way contributed to the staging 
of this production, whether through the donation of time and service, 
talent, costumes, properties, or general support. The finished product 
stands as a symbol of their efforts; without them it could not have- 
been done. 



Mascoutdh ""HH^ Publishing Co. 






PREFACE 









History is the recounting- of the major events in the lives of human beings. 
It tells when and where a thing- happened, and it tells how a thing- happened. 
But usually, it does rot tell why a thing happened. The reason for this is per- 
fectly obvious. In the first place, the how, when, and wherefore of an event 
is well known. Tiiis information is all grouped under that accurate but often- 
times dull heading, 'Facts". On the other hand, to know why the action ocurred 
is not so much to inquire into fact but rather to inquire into the inner motives 
of the men who figured in the action. It is not factual but spiritual. Therefore, 
of necessity, it lends itself to personal interpretation, and accordingly is not 
accurate enough for history. 

In collecting material for the writing of this drama covering the 100 years 
of Mascoutah's existence, I have found it to fall into two categories: (1) that 
which lends itself to dramatic reproduction on the stage, and (2) that which 
does noi. Material of the latter type was, of course, discarded at once as im- 
practicable. Upon careful consideration, the first type of material, or that which 
could be produced, was found usually to lack the conflict and vigor which is so 
necessary to dramatic production. There was that acute lack of the human 
quality which made it sound so very true but so very unmoving. The further 
impossibility of authentically representing real characters did not help the 
problem any. It was, therefore, the most advisable procedure to discard this 
material also. 

The following plan was then adopted: — To present the history of a purely 
fictitious family and show how the history of Mascoutah and the United States 
might have affected it. Consequently, the characters are all imaginary, and no 
resemblance between them and real people was intended. The situations which 
they themselves create are also unreal. The time and actual historical events 
used, are, however, as perfectly true and authentic as the information I was 
able to obtain. 

It has been my endeavor to show how this city might have influenced — and 
probably did — the lives or" people living in it. I have been concerned not so 
much with what happened, but rather why I think it happened. This production 
is therefore dedicated to that spirit of romance and adventure which mad^ men 
and women pioneers — and shall always make men and women pioneers, no mat 
ter what age they live in. If your imagination is stimulated a trifle to think a 
bit about what may have gone on behind the scenes of history in this e'ty, 
tins production will have done all it was intended to do. 

— The Author 




SYNOPSIS - "AS TIME GOES ON" 



"As Time Goes On" has its beginning one June afternoon in 1837 in the 
camp of the Maseoutans on the Great River. The chief is bargaining with 
White Star, Chief of the Tamaroans of Turkey Hill, for the marriage of his 
daughter, Tahasee, to White Star. Before an agreement can be reached the 
news of the arrival of the white traders from Fort St. Louis down the river, 
puts the camp into instant pandemonium. The traders find an eager group 
awaiting them. 

Among the traders is a young man who automatically becomes the leader 
of the group — Jack Barrows. He suddenly sees the Princess Tahasee for the 
first time and engages her in conversation. She very naively discloses that 
she does not wish to marry White Star, because she has fallen in love with 
Jack himself en one of his earlier visits there. Making a spur-of-the-moment 
decision, Jack decides he will marry her in spite of the mixture of races and 
the opposition from old Chief Mascoutah. After successfully repelling an 
attack by White Star, Jack and Tahasee leave the camp for Mechanicsburg. 
The old Chief calls the curse of the Great Spirit down upon his disobedient 
daughter and disowns her forever, as the entire tribe joins in the Death 
Lament for the death of their Princess. 

Nineteen years later finds the tiny settlement of Mechanicsburg grown 
into a fair sized town. The townspeople, under the guidance of Barrows, have 
called a meeting for the following day, July 1, 1856, to see about incorporating 
it as a town. The interest shown is very favorable until a sharp agitator, Jasper 
Johnson, comes from Belleville and stirs up trouble. Faced by the crowd, he 
and Jack have a show-down and Johnson is cleverly defeated. He is taken 
over by the townspeople, who plan to run him, out. But due to sympathy from 
a few, he escapes them and comes back to Jack. He begins a voluntary quarrel. 
In the fight that ensues, Tahasee endeavors to shield Barrows and is accident- 
ally shot herself. 

By the time the Civil War breaks in 1862, Jack Barrows is a man of about 
45. He has been married again and his two daughters by Tahasee — Jane and 
Meredith, are 12 and 15 years of age. Jane, the younger, is greatly thrilled over 
her father's appointment to Gen. Grant's staff, but Meredith dreads the thought 
of losing her father. His commission finally arrives through Commodore Foote 
in St. Louis, and he prepares to leave at once. It is the first of a series of pain- 
ful goodbyes to Meredith Barrows. 

In 1898, we find her a woman of 51 with a son, Gordon, of about 25. TIk- war 
with Spain has been carried from Cuba to Manilla, and need for enlistments are 
getting more urgent all the time. Jane Barrow's son, Pdchard, arrives from New 
York enroute to California and the Philippines, and adroitly talks the level- 
headed Gordon into leaving his mother and sweetheart, Janice Lawn, and going 
with him. 

Upon Gordon's return, he and Janice patch up the break his going caused, 
and are married. In October, 1918, we find them a middle aged couple, who have 
a son themselves of about 19 years of age. Harley thinks he should join the 
army, but his mother dreads the separation. She calls in his grandmother, old 
Meredith Barrows Haymer, but even she cannot change his mind. The final 
stroke comes when a Liberty Loan Team comes to Mascoutah and gives a pro- 
gram on the street corner. Harley makes the break oil family ties and leaves 
with the Team for the War Office. 

The present finds the fifth in the line of Chief Mascoutah's descendents, 
young Meredith Haymer, celebrating her engagement to Brian Webber of New 
York. To them comes old Meredith Haymer, now over 90, to wish them well. At 
first her rather dreary views of the future, based on her past experiences, damp- 
en the youthful ardors of young Meredith. But eventually, youth's optimism 
comes to the fore, and Meredith and Brian voice their steadfast belief in the 
future — the visicn of a perfect city in a wiser and kinder world. 



ACT I - IKE BEGINNING 
SCENE I - INDIAN PERIOD 



Time — June, 1837 
Place — The camp of Chief Mascoutah near the Great River 

CASE - <AS YOU MEET THEM) 



CHIEF MASCOUTAH, chief of the Mascoutans 

TAHASEE, his daughter 

HANAWATEE, an Indian Squaw 

WHITE STAR, chief of the Tamaroans 

MANUTAH, an Indian Runner 

JACK BARROWS, a fur trader 

CY LAWTON, his partner 

RUFE KING, silent partner of the firm 



Elmer Doebert 

Cathrine Helen Pfeifer 

Helen Harding 

Robert Jackson 

Eugene Weaver 

Roland Heyde 

John Heinlein 

August Joellenbeck 



Marcella Heyde 
Marcella Rist 
Luanne Pfeifer 
Patty Lill 
Dorothy Lill 
Opal Siebe 



INDIAN CHORUS 

Mona Hassebrock 
Maxine Siebe 
Ellen Plesetz 
Hazel Beimfohr 
Marie Fett 
Miriam Scheel 



Marcella Moll 
Josephine Moll 
Rita Diekemper 
Lucille Hommel 
Marie Welker 
Mildred Muehlhauser 



SOLO DANCER — Helen Waggoner 



MUSICAL NUMBERS 



"Indian Dawn" 
"Indian Spring Song" 
"Indian Love Call" 
"Farewell, My People" 
"Indian Death Lament" 



Choir and Chorus 

Tahasee 

Jack Barrows 

Tahasee 

Choir and Chorus 



ACT I - SCENE II 
INCORPORATION PERIOD 



Time — June 30, 1856 
A Street in Mascoutah 

CAST - (AS YOU MEET THEM) 



MRS. KURT, a resident of Mascoutah 

MRS. HILFMEISTER, her friend 

JAKE ROTHBAUM, the town's bachelor 

MRS. GRAILLEY, the town's gossip 

JACK BARROWS, - 

TAHASEE BARROWS - 

CY LAWTON, _____ 

RUFE KING, ----- 

JASPER JOHNSON, land owner from Belleville 



Clara Hertz 

Marcella Pfiefer 

Peter Lischer 

Marietta Reed 

Roland Heyde 

Catherine Pfeifer 

John Heinlein 

August Joellenbeck 

Otto Scharth 



Karl Freivogel 
Oliver Etling 
Frederic Hoerdt 
Delbert Hoercher 



TOWNSPEOPLE 

Byron Wente 
Harlan Mueller 
Robert Jackson 
Elmer Doebert 
Stanley Schubkegel 



Allan Liebig 
Richard Reinhardt 
Tom Walthes 
Eugene Weaver 



MUSICAL NUMBERS 

Harmony numbers _ _ _ 

"In the Evening by the Moonlight" 
"I've Been Workin' on the Railroad" 
"Oh! Susanna" 
"Cornfield Medley" 
"The Old Gray Mare" 
"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot 

"Im Wald und auf der Heide" 



Townspeople 



Guitar players 
"Indian Spring Song" 



jJake Rothbaum 
/Mrs. Hilfmeister 
John Brower and son 
Jack Barrows 



ACT II - PERIOD OF THE WARS 
SCENE I - THE CIVIL WAR 



Place 



Time — Early Spring, 1862 
The porch of Jack Barrows' home in Mascoutah 



CAST • (AS YOU MEET THEM) 



JANE BARROWS, Jack's youngest daughter 

MEREDITH, her sister - 

AUNT SARAH, Ruth Barrow's sister 

BILLIE AMES, boy next door 

JACK BARROWS, 

A UNION SOLDIER, from Com. Foote in St. Louis 



Jane Frazier 

Betty Mae Phillips 

Marcella I^eyde 

Delbert Hoercher 

Roland Heyde 

Oliver Etling 



Charlotte Boiler 
Jeanette Benz 
Lucy Jane Cluck 
Dorothy Schilling 



BELLES OF THE 60s 

Virginia Frazier 
Frances Brower 
Alys Boman 
Joyce Stahlheber 



June Imol Heinlein 
Eileen Clements 
Fay Schragg 
Marguerite Leibrock 



SOLOIST — Pearl Dick 
SOLO DANCER — Helen Waggoner 



MUSICAL NUMBERS 



"A Heart That's Free" 
"Battle Hymn of Republic" 
"Tenting Tonight" 
"John Brown's Body" 



Pearl Dick 

Jane 

Jane and Billie 

Jane and Billie 



"I'll be With You When the Roses Bloom Again" - Jane 
"Sweet Genevieve" - Jane, Billie and Meredith 

"How Can I Leave Thee" - - Jack Barrows 



ACT II - SCENE II 
SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 



Time — Summer, 1898 
Place — Same as Scene I, Act II 



CAST - (AS YOU MEET THEM) 

MEREDITH BARROWS HAYMER, - - Betty Mae Phillips 

GORDON HAYMER, her son Tom Walthes 

GREGORY HAYMER, her husband - - Stanley Schubkegel 

JANICE LAWN, a neighbor girl - - - Lucille Ayres 

RICHARD AMES, Jane Barrow's son from the East - Allan Liebig 



'GAY NINETIES" CHORUS 

Augusta Schubkegel Beatrice Etling Leona Kebel 

Mildred Grauel Luanne Pfeifer Mary Swain 

Violet Hund Dorothy Lill Aretta Sanders 

Patty Lill 

SOLOIST — Willard Friederich 



MUSICAL NUMBERS 

"Lazy Moon" - - - Willard Friederich 

"You Are the Rose of My Heart" - - Gordon 

"Elegie" -..__. Janice 

"In the Time of Roses" - Choir 



ACT II -SCENE III 
THE WORLD WAR 



Time — October, 1918 
Place — Same as Scene I, Act II 



CASE -(AS YOU MEET THEM) 



GORDON HAYMER, 

JANICE LAWN HAYMER, his wife 

MEREDITH HAYMER, 

HARLEY HAYMER, Meredith's grandson 

CLAIRE ST. JOHN, Harley's fiancee 



Tom Walthes 

Lucille Ayres 

Betty Mae Phillips 

Fredric Hoerdt 

Virginia Cluck 



RECRUITING COMMITTEE 



SPEAKER, 

JOE COLLINS, song leader 
MARIE PARKER, entertainer 
CHARLIE APIN, comedy song man 



Richard Reinhardt 

Wallace Karstens 

Louise Harding 

George Whitecotton 



Roland Heyde 
Stanley Schubkegel 
Delbert Hoercher 
Oliver Etling 
Robert Jackson 
Elmer Doebert 



TOWNSPEOPLE 

Allan Liebig 
Peter Lischer 
August Joellenbeck 
John Heinlein 
Eugene Weaver 
Harlan Mueller 



Byron Wente 
Marcella Heyde 
Marcella Pfeifer 
Clara Hertz 
Elvira Bopp 
Jane Frazier 



MUSICAL NUMBERS 

"Goodbye Broadway, Hello France 

"My Buddy" 

"Darktown Strutter's Ball" 

"K-K-K-Katie" - 

"'Til We Meet Again" 

"I Love Thee" - 

"Over There" - 



Townspeople 

Joe Collins 

Marie Parker 

Charlie Apin 

Harley 

Claire 

Choir 



ACT III 

NEW BEGINNING 



Time — The Present 
Place — Same as Scene I, Act II 

CASI - (AS YOU MEET THEM) 



TRIO, 



Jeanette Benz, Marguerite Leibrock, Charlotte Boiler 



HARLEY HAYMER, ...... 

SOLO DANCER, 

CLAIRE ST. JOHN HAYMER, Harley's wife 

MEREDITH HAYMER, their daughter 

BRIAN WEBBER, her fiance 

OLD MEREDITH HAYMER, 



Fredric Hoerdt 

Helen Waggoner 

Virginia Cluck 

Marietta Reed 

Karl Freivogel 

Betty Mae Phillips 



1937 CHORUS 



Louise Monken 
Marie Stoffel 
Ophelia Mueth 
Kathryn Kilian 



Elvira Stein 
Cathrine Pfeifer 
Mary Dolenc 
Ruth Bramstedt 



Elma Cleland 
Patricia Faul 
Eileen Clements 
Wilma Wendler 



PARTY GUESTS 



Harlan Mueller 
George Whitecotton 
Byron Wente 
Eugene Weaver 



Boyce Garvin. 
Roland Heyde 
Stanley Schubkegel 
Oliver Etling 



Elmer Doebert 
Allan Liebig 
Richard Reinhardt 
Tom Walthes 



MUSICAL NUMBERS 



"Stardust" 
"At Dawning' 
Finale 



Trio 

Brian 

Entire Company 



ORCHESTRA 

Directed by Arthur Benz 



Piano — Anna L. Montag 

Violins — Grenard Mueller, Julius Stoffel, Cathrine Pfeifer 
Twyla Schmitz 

Trumpets — Adolph Bieser, Robert Stoffel 
Cello — Virginia Frazier 
Clarinet — Roland Dagit 
Bass Violin — Edgar Dagit 
Trombone — L. C. Cannon 
Drums — Arthur Jacobs 



CHOIR OF FIFTY VOICES 

Directed by Miss Pearl Dick 



Including all women in the cast plus the following 

Celestine Jung Mrs. L. W. Groennert 

Mary Louise Bene Mrs. Albert Stein 

Alma F. Wombacher Mrs. Wm. Stahl 

Marguerite Laquet Mrs. Alma Menzi 

Miss Louisa Liebig Miss Pauline Lischer 

Mrs. R. F. Lischer Miss Bertha C. Stein 

Mrs. Hy. Mueller Mrs. Oscar Weaver 

PIANIST — Ada Weil 
VIOLINIST — Twyla Schmitz 



ITTEES 



CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 



City of Mascoutah 

Raymond Pfeifer 
Herman Rieger 
Louis Reinhardt 
William Weber 
Albert Meyer 
Louis Grcennert 
E. H. Kilian 



Mascoutah Commercial Club 

W. C. Freivogel 
J. D. Mollman 
Rev. A. W. Hoelscher 
Erwin Mann 
A. L. A. Moll 
Earl Wente 
Homer Stahl 
Henry Bene 



LIGHTS 

Casper Leibrock, Chr. 

AMPLIFYING 

Wallace Harpstrite, Chr. 

TICKETS 

Curt Dauber 

PARADE 

Erwin Mann 



STAGE CONSTRUCTION 
August Joellenbeck, Chr. 

ADVERTISING 

Philip Kammann, Chr. 



SEATING 
A. L. A. 



Moll, Chr. 



HISTORY ARRANGEMENT 

Anna L. Montag 



STAGE DECORATION 
Mrs. Roland Heyde, Chr. 



COM. FOR SCENE I, ACT I 
Miss Pauline Lischer, Chr. 
Mrs. Harold Stout 
Mrs. L. C. Cannon 
Miss Louise Liebig 
Mrs. H. Lill 
Mrs. E. A. Karstens 

COM. FOR SCENE II, ACT I 
Mrs. Wm. Kolar, Chr. 
Miss Alma Wombacher 
Miss Anne Biskar 
Mrs. Fred Bergheger 
Mrs. John Klopmeyer 

COM. FOR SCENE I, ACT II 
Miss Edna Richter, Chr. 
Mrs. Frank Boman 
Mrs. Hermine Kolar 
Mrs. O. H. Harding 
Mrs. John Malacarne 
Miss Adelia Moll 

COM. FOR SCENE II, ACT II 
Mrs. Alma Menzi, Chr. 
Mrs. Hy. Mueller 
Miss Irene Ohl 
Mrs. Elma Brookman 



COM. FOR SCENE III, ACT 1L 

Mrs. Oscar Weaver, Chr. 
Mrs. Chas. Klingel 
Mrs. Irwin Lembke 
Mrs. Guy Morgan 
Mrs. Christina Krausz 

COM. FOR ACT III 

Mrs. Earl Wente, Chr. 
Mrs. Abby Klees 
Mrs. Chester Pitt 
Mrs. Leroy Perrottet 
Mrs. Stewart Legendre 
Mrs. Jewel Singleton 

COSTUMES 

Mrs. Alvin Kolb, Chr. 
Miss Helen Kilian 
Mrs. John Beatty 
Mrs. E. Friederich 
Miss Celestine Legendre 
Mrs. Wm. Stahl 
Mrs. Martin Moeller 
Mrs. J. W. Donner 
Mrs. Aug. Joellenbeck 
Miss Cathrine Pfeifer 
Miss Florence Moeller 



SECRETARY — Miss Cathrine Helen Pfeifer 

Chorus costumes made by W.P.A. Sewing Project No. 7171 of St. Clair 
Co. Miss Ora Smith, cutter 

Advertising Float supervised by Robert Jackson 



PARADE LINE-UP 



FATHER TIME 

INDIANS ON HORSEBACK 

LIFE IN THE INDIAN CAMP — Bethel M. E. Church 

WAR COUNCIL OF THE INDIAN CHI EFS — Masons and Eastern Star 

THE COMING OF THE WHITE MAN — Woodland Grange 

PIONEERS ON HORSEBACK 

THE COVERED WAGON 

PIONEER LIFE — Parent-Teachers Ass'n. 

PETER CARTWRIGHT, THE CIRCUIT RIDER 

MECHANICSBURG SAWMILL AND POSTOFFICE, 1837 — Holy 
Childhood Church 

MECHANICSBURG BECOMES MASCOUTAH, 1839 — Moose Lodge 

PONY RIDDEN MAIL 

THE FIRST CHURCH, 1842 — Rotary Club 

DUETCHES SCHULE VEREIN, 1842 — School Districts 17 and 18 

INCORPORATION OF MASCOUTAH, 1856 — City of Mascoutah 

CIVIL WAR PERIOD, 1862 — Rebekahs and Odd Fellows 

SOCIETY OF THE 60's — Senior Woman's Club 

COUNTRY DOCTOR 

FIRST RAILROAD, 1870 — Teamster's Union 

CYCLONE OF 1896 — Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church 

WAR WITH SPAIN, 1898 — M.C.H.S. Alumni Association 

SOCIETY OF THE NINETIES — St. John Ev. Church 

FIRST AUTOMOBILE — Commercial Club 

WORLD WAR, 1917 — American Legion and Auxiliary 

WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE, 1920 — Junior Woman's Club 

"AS TIME GOES ON" — Commercial Club 



100 YEARS AGO 

OR . .HOW MASGOUTAH HAD IIS STAR! 

(Condensed From the "Early History of Mascoutah' 
By Attorney Peter W. Lill) 



BEGINNING 

In the survey of the plat of 1814, the Township had about one- 
third timber, the balance shown as prairie. The prairie was about one- 
half overgrown with thickets of young trees and shrubbery, the re- 
mainder open prairie. There were ponds scattered throughout the 
prairie, the last of these being drained and cultivated on the Kuehn 
farm in Section 26 and 36, in 1872. 

In 1830 a revolution was begun in southern Germany, agitated by 
the students of Heidelberg University, its graduates and friends. When 
about to meet with success, they were quieted on the arrival of Prus- 
sian soldiers. As the local governments became stronger, the persecu- 
tion became more oppressive and a large number of followers fled. In 
1831 Theodore Hilgard, Jr., was sent by his family and friends to 
America on a trip of inspection to find a suitable location. He finally 
arrived at Belleville, and found conditions satisfactory, and 
bought an improved farm located north of the present Highway No. 15, 
midway between Belleville and Mascoutah. He returned to Germany 
and in 1832 came back to this country with his family, his brothers 
Frederick and Edward, who were both bachelors, and a number of 
highly educated "Lateiners", friends of the family. Among them were 
Dr. Berkelmann, George Bunsen, Theodore J. Krafft, Gustavus Heim- 
berger and August Conradi, the latter a Swiss. They were all young 
men and kept "bachelors roost" on the farm for a number of years. 
Prior to 1837, Berkelmann and Krafft went to Belleville and Bunsen 
to the north part of Shiloh Valley, later to Belleville. In 1833-34, they 
were followed by others, some locating in Shiloh Valley, in Belleville 
and St. Louis. A reliable report states that in 1837 Shiloh Valley had 
400 souls, and of these 160 were German. 

In 1831 came John Knobeloch from Hesse Darmstadt on a trip of 
inspection. He bought a well-improved farm about two miles west of 
Mascoutah, north of State Highway No. 15. He returned to Germany and 
in 1832 came back with his brothers Balthaser, Thomas and George, 
and other friends. With them came George Reinhardt, his wife and 
son George, who located north of the City Cemetery. They were the first 
German settlers east of Silver Creek. In 1833-34 came a number of 
friends of Knobeloch, who located on Turkey Hill. 

At the beginning of 1836, the town plats filed were Belleville 
(1814), Illinoistown, now East St. Louis, (1817), and Lebanon (1825). 
Town plats not filed were Cahokia and Prairie du Pond, a hamlet hear 
Cahokia. 

In 1836-37 there was a craze in laying out towns, those platted in 
1836 being Urbana, now Freeburg, Athens, now New Athens, Tamarawa 
on the west bank of the Okaw river, south of New Athens, now vacated, 
and Jefferson on the west bank of the Okaw River, where the present 
Jefferson road in Engelmann township if travelled east will cross the 
river, the town also now vacated. In 1837, the towns platted were 



HOW MASCOUTAH HAD ITS START 



Centerville, now Millstadt, Fayetteville and Mechanicsburg, now 
Mascoutah. 

MECHANICSBURG 

The town of Mechanicsburg, now Mascoutah, was laid out on a 
te.i-acre tract of land in the southwest corner of the Northwest quarter 
of Section No. 32, Town One, North Range 6 West, St. Clair County, 
Illinois. This northwest quarter (160 acres) was entered by Hugh Gil- 
breath on December 18th, 1816, and entered in the land book May 26th, 

1817. Hugh, James and John Gilbreath, sons of Hugh Gilbreath, and 
their wive? sold this quarter section and more land September 6th, 

1818, to Edward Mitchell for $8,000.00. February 10th, 1836, Edward 
Mitchell conveyed this quarter section to his son Samuel Mitchell, Jr., 
for $100.00 and love and affection. Samuel Mitchell, Jr., sold this 
ten-acre tract of land, the town site of the intended town of Enterprise, 
to John Flanagan and Theodore J. Crafft. This was an error in spelling, 
the name should have been Krafft. The deed was dated June 2nd, 1836 
and recorded May 16th, 1837. It was recorded in Book I, at page 174. 
The deed had been held in escrow. The town plat of the Town of Me- 
chanicsburg, dated April 6th, 1837, was filed for record May 6th, 1837. 
At that time, the date of filing and recording the town plat was the 
lawful date establishing the town. 

The ten-acre tract of land is more fully described as commencing 
the .survey thereof at a stone in the northwest corner of Lot No. 18, 
Block 3, Eisenmayer's first addition to the Town of Mascoutah, it being 
the southeast corner of Railway avenue and South street, thence run- 
ning north along the section line between Sections 31 and 32, the east 
side of Railway avenue, a distance of 660 feet, bringing it two feet in 
the alley north of Main street, thence east 660 feet to Lebanon street, 
thence south 660 feet along the south side of South street, thence west, 
to the place of beginning. The streets from east to west were South 
street (40 feet wide), Main, now State street (54 feet wide), and Mill, 
now Main street (40 feet wide). This left two feet north of blocks 1 and 
2, now part of the alley, through the center, north and south Market 
street (60 feet wide), leaving nothing for Schmahl street, now Railway 
avenue, on the west, nor for Lebanon street on the east. 

Samuel Mitchell, Jr., laid out and platted the town of Enterprise, 
plat not filed, the site being the ten-acre tract, the site of the original 
town of Mechanicsburg, now Mascoutah. The St. Louis and Shawnee- 
town Mail Route passed on its south end. Mitchell erected a 14x16 foot 
log cabin one block south of Main street, between Railway avenue and 
Market street. It was the first building in Mascoutah. 

The ever increasing number of Germans arriving in the county 
caused Frederick Hilgard, Gustavus Heimberger and Augustus Conradi, 
the latter a Swiss, and their friends to project a town to attract them 
and Mechanicsburg was the result. They induced John Flanagan and 
Theodore J. Krafft, the latter a former bachelor mate, to buy from 
Samuel Mitchell, Jr., the Enterprise town site together with his saw 
mill. 

The foregoing may be taken as the time, June 2nd, 1836, when the 
first steps were taken to establish the Town of Mechanicsburg, also the 
time when the contract was made with Samuel Mitchell, Jr., for the 
removal of his saw mill, located south of State Highway No. 15, on the 



100 YEARS AGO 



OR 



southeast quarter of Section No. 29, Shiloh Valley, now the Moser 
farm, to the town site. 

There was some progress made in 1836. The building of the 14x16 
foot leg cabin and other improvements on the mill lot, the erection of 
a one-room, one-story frame building on lot No. 37, also the establishing 
of the Mechanicsburg post office September 28th, 1836, with Robert 
D. Brewington as its postmaster. 

None of the land adjoining the town site was improved or occu- 
pied. Flanagan and Krafft did not own any land adjoining the town. 
North, east and west was owned by Samuel Mitchell, Jr., and south by 
John H. Gay. Neither of them seemed to have faith in the growth of 
the town, made no additions nor ever owned any lot in town. They 
also did not improve nor cultivate their land. In 1836, there was no land 
in cultivation nor a building within one and one-half mile of the town 
site, except a hut, the present location of the home premises of Ph. 
H. Postel, on south Railway avenue, occupied by Dixon, a hunter and 
trapper, who soon removed to the Silver Creek Bottom, later left 
and nothing farther is known of him. 

The promoters knew that the competition for trade would be keen. 
The thriving village of Lebanon on the north, had two daily mails, 
Jefferson about five and a half miles south and Fayetteville would soon 
have a ferry across the Okaw river, saw mill and merchants, and 

Urbana, now Freeburg, drew the trade 
from Turkey Hill. Added to this was the 
prejudice of the American settlers, the old 
Hession hatred. The Americans in the 
northern part of the township and around 
Lebanon did not tolerate Germans amongst 
them, this being shown as late as 1850. It 
would be a hard task for the enterprise 
to be a success, so their only interest was 
to dispose of their town lots. 

Early conveyances by Flanagan and 
Kraft included the following: March 20th, 
1837, to Conradi & Co., five lots, later sev- 
en more. Augustus Conradi, Frederick Hil- 
gard and Gustavus Heimberger formed a 
partnership under the firm name of Con- 
radi & Co. Lots were also conveyed to Theodoer Hilgard, Jr., Edward 
Hilgard, Fred L. Engelmann, Gustave Koerner and Fred Kempff, who 
did not improve them. The second conveyance and the first of record 
was made April 28th, 1837, being Lot No. 37, the southwest corner of 
State and Lebanon street to F. B. Marshall, who in 1836 had taken 
possesion of said lot, and erected a one-story frame building thereon 
for a store and the post office. May 18th, 1837, they conveyed to Con- 
radi & Co., the mill site, Lot 13, all of Block No. 3, with the appurten- 
ances thereto belonging. 

Conradi & Co., as soon as they held the title to the mill plant, be- 
gan operating the mills. In 1839 they added a corn grist mill. The mem- 
bers of the firm could not do the necessary work, so had to hire help. 
The small trade did not cover expenses. This and the lack of harmony 
among the partners caused the dissolution of the firm and on Septem- 
ber 7th, 1839, Conradi and Heimberger sold their interest to Hilgard. 

In 1838, there were few buildings in the town, erected on Main 
now State street. As mentioned before, the first building on the town 




HOW MASCOUTAH HAD ITS START 



site was the 14x16 foot log cabin erected on the mill lot, which was 
soon followed by a one-story frame, erected for a store and the post 
office. Conradi & Co., built a one-story frame mercantile building on 
Lot No. 20, the northwest corner of Main, now State, and Lebanon 
street. In September, 1840, Ausby Fike, a merchant at Jefferson, re- 
moved his building and store from Jefferson to Mascoutah and erected 
the building on Lot No. 1, the northwest corner of Mill, now Main, and 
Lebanon street. In 1854, Julius Scheve, the then owner, cut the build- 
ing into two parts, removing one to the west side of the lots, the other, 
16x18 feet, being removed to East Patterson street, now the west part 
of the Oscar Frlederich residence, 415 East Patterson street. 

Robert Dashiell Brewington, the first postmaster of Mechanicsburg, 
now Mascoutah, was born in 1808, in Maryland. In 1836 he came west 
to St. Louis, where he met F. B. Marshall, a merchant at Jefferson, who 
employed him. Marshall wanted a post office closer than Belleville, 15 
mile:; away. The location of Jefferson did not justify one. The closest 
point was in Mechanicsburg on the St. Louis and Shawneetown Mail 
Route. He was the prime mover in establishing the Mechanicsburg 
post office and the appointing of Robert D. Brewington its first post- 
master. During the time of getting the postoffice, Marshall erected a 
one-story frame building on Lot No. 37, Original Town, at the south- 
west corner of State and Lebanon street, stocked it with merchandise 
z.nd had. Brewington its manager and the post office located there. Aug- 
ust A. Conradi, his successor, was appointed postmaster July 26th, 1837. 
Brewington returned to Maryland, where he married and with his bride 
came west, locating at or near Bowling Green, Pike county, Missouri, 
iater moving to Hannibal, Mo. 

CHANGE OF NAME FROM MECHANICSBURG TO MASCOUTAH 

The post office department decreed that there be not more thai' 
one post office of the same name in any one state. Illinois having two 
named Mechanicsburg, one in Sangamon county and one in St. Clair 
county. The one in Sangamon county established in 1832, being the first, 
retained its name. The postmaster at Mechanicsburg, now Mascoutah, 
was notified of the decree and directed to change its name. John Hay, the 
then Circuit Clerk, was the first to suggest the name of Mascoutah and 
on August 6th, 1838, Mechanicsburg post office was changed to Mascou- 
tah. August F. Conradi was reappointed August 6th, 1838. John Hay 
took the name Mascoutah from an Indian tribe, whose name was Mas- 
cou-tah. 

A peculiar fact is that when the name of the town was changed by 
an Act of the General Assembly, dated December 1st, 1838, the Act 

read, " shall be and is hereby changed to that of Muscautah, by 

which latter name it shall be known and called in all public records 

and all legal transactions ". This Act was passed on February 

16th, 1839, and approved on Februray 19th, 1839. The inhabitants of 
the town did not follow the name of "Muscautah," but used the name 
of its post office, Mascoutah. February 4th, 1857, the town was incor- 
porated and in its charter it is named Mascoutah. 

On July 13th, 1840, Frederick Hilgard sold the mill lot and more 
to Conrad Eisenmayer and Philip H. Eisenmayer. Before adjusting all 
his affairs, he became disgusted with the conditions in America and 
left for Germany, where he died, leaving the settlement of his affairs 
to his friends. 



100 YEARS AGO 



OR 




fe«a#fe 



Augustus Conradi, naturalized in. 1839, having left Mascoutah, we 
learned that he lost his life in the Mexican War. His widow, Louisa 
Conradi, in 1854, erected, a two-story brick mercantile building at the 
northeast corner of Main and Jefferson street, occupying it with her 
brother, Zeno Buerki, as a bakery and confectionery. In 1863, she sold 
it and acquired the one-story brick building now 217 East Main street 
where she died in 1870. 

Gustavus Heimberger, naturalized in 1838, was of a roving nature. 
He left Mascoutah for Cuba, later turning up in Central America. Dur- 
ing the Mexican War, he was interpreter for General Shields. He lost 
his left arm in battle. In 1856 he returned to Belleville, where he died 
in 1858. He left his wife, nee Lafontaine, and son, Rudolph W. Heim- 
berger, late of Fayetteville. The latter was born December 29th, 1838, 
known as the first child born in Mascoutah. 
Others claim that Louis Hauck, a prominent 
lawyer and railroad builder, late of Cape 
Giraradeau, Mo., was the first. I find Hauck 
was born in Mascoutah April 1st, 1840, and 
died at Elm Wood, Cape Girardeau county, 
Mo., February 17th, 1925. 

The saw and grist mills, the nucleus 
around which the town grew, is important 
in its history. Conrad and Philip H. Eisen- 
mayer took charge of the mills. With them 
came Conrad Eisenmayer's wife and sister, 
the late Mrs. Philip H. Postel, and friends 
from Horse Prairie, near Red Bud, Monroe 
county, 111. The women lived and slept in the 
14x16 foot log cabin, without a floor, attic, 
kitchen or cellar. They did their cooking 
without a stove and with few utensils 
outside the building. The men slept in the mill. They had plenty of food, 
principally corn meal, pork and game. All were young people and were 
contented. 

In 1840 the town of Jefferson lost its saw mill by fire, with no 
hope:; of having it rebuilt. The merchants disposed of their stock of 
merchandise and the buildings were either removed or wrecked. The 
town site was vacated. The loss of this competition, and gaining the 
«ood will of the Americans, soon brought trade and kept the Eisenmay- 
ers busy. In November, 1841, Philip H. Postel entered the firm. In 
1842 the grist mill was improved by adding machinery to grind wheat 
for flour. This increased their trade and kept them busy sawing lumber 
during the day and grinding grain at night. The firm bought a water 
mill near Red Bud, Conrad Eisenmayer operating the same. Lack of 
water proved its failure and it was sold at a loss. During this decade 
1840-50, Conrad and Philip H. Eisenmayer retired from the firm and 
Andrew Eisenmayer entered, the firm now being Postel & Eisenmayer. 
At the end of the decade, this firm began the erection of a flour mill 
at the southwest corner of Schmahl, now Railway avenue, and Main 
street, the present Postel Mills. 

American farmers and landowners sold their land, some moving 
west, others either sold or rented their farms and located in town, 
building and occupying dwellings. Of these there were 17 on Jefferson 
street in four blocks north of Main street, and seven on Independence 
street, all erected by Americans. 

In 1856, when they became owners of the flour mill, they were 




and did their washing 



HOW MASCOUTAH HAD ITS START 



at their highest control and led in financial, political, official and busi- 
ness affairs. After this, they gradually lost out, the Germans by their 
thrift and economy, accumulated wealth and bought their interests and 
they began to leave the town. Philip H. Postel got back into the mill 
firm in 1867, became sole owner in 1877 and turned it over to the Ph. 
H. Postel Milling Co. in 1886. 

The first brick building in Mascoutah was erected in 1845, at the 
northeast corner of Main and Market street, by Charles Coester and 
Julius Scheve. It had thirty feet front on Main street and extending 
about fifty feet on Market street, with twenty feet for store and ten 
feet for storage room. This was rebuilt with a two-story mansard roof, 
making it three stories. The store remained as originally built, later 
being wrecked to make room for the Hagist Department Store. The 
next brick building was a one-story dwelling, 105 E. Main, which was 
also wrecked later to make an addition to the Hagist store. 

Mill, now Main street, between Schmahl street, now Railway ave- 
nue, and Lebanon street, became its business section. Most of the early 
merchants were Americans, the first Ausby Fike. Others soon followed, 
of these a few Germans holding small stock. The demand being small, 
a wagon load would stock the store. Goods were bought in St. Louis and 
hauled by ox team, taking two days for a round trip. 

Oi the American farmers who sold their farms, many moved near 
to Warrensburg, Marshall and Clinton, Missouri. They wanted to get 
away from the malaria-infected country and get rid of the fever, also 
to get cheaper land. Others made their home in town. The younger 
generation began to locate in town. 

In 1814, Lorenz Leibrock, father of the late Dr. George Leibrock, 
came with his family to Mascoutah. He bought an improved farm, pay- 
ing for the farm and personal property, $2,800. The same year the 
Richter and Friederich families and others came to Mascoutah, crossing 
the river at St. Louis on the ferry boat from Third street and landing 
on the bluffs. 

In 1849-50, the cholera epidemic, which spread over this country, 
was dreadful in this community. Some say four, others as high as seven 
deaths occurred in a day. Four is the reliable number given. There was 
no public cemetery at or near the town, the closest being the Fike ceme- 
tery in the northwest part of Section No. 27, where most of the burials 
were made. This cemetery was used by the community until 1853, when 
burials were first made in the public cemetery on South Dietz, now 
2nd. street. 

1850-60. During this decade the town had a building and business 
boom. The Crimean War took place during this time. A great part of 
the foodstuff required by the English, French and Turkish armies in 
their preparations and during the war, was shipped from New Orleans. 
With a plank road, built in 1853, to Belleville and a railroad, 1854, and 
macadam road from there to St. Louis, gave the mill and farmers a 
good road to trade in St. Louis market. This brought prosperity to the 
town and farmers. The mill plant was enlarged and improved its cap- 
acity. The flour was packed in barrels and shipped to St. Louis. This 
made a demand for coopers and teamsters. Buildings were erected all 
over town, most of them two and three-room dwellings. Three three- 
fct»ry buildings were built on East Main street, Nos. 5, 11-13 and 8-10, 
and twenty-two two-story brick, six of them wrecked, the remainder 
now in 1937, standing. 

The Town of Mascoutah was incorporated February 4th, 1857, date 



100 YEARS AGO 



given by the Illinois State Library. February 19th, 1857, was the date 
when the act was approved by the Governor. A meeting of the citizens 
was called to be held at the Fike school house, now 205 N. Jefferson 
street, on July 1st, 1856, the object being to incorporate the town. Re- 
sult, for incorporation 36 votes, against 12 votes. Pursuant to the elec- 
tion of said meeting, an election was held July 8th, 1856, at the Union 
Hall, public building west of the present city hall, to elect five trustees. 
Alex Ross, Max Scheel, Christian Scheurer, John Peter Fries and A. J. 
McNail, were duly elected. On July 25th, 1856, the board organized by 
electing Alex Ross, president and H. C. Fike, clerk. A number of elec- 
tions were held from September, 1866, to April, 1883, to organize a city. 
The town was divided into two wards, Railway avenue being the divid- 
ing line. 

For nineteen years, 1838 to 1857, the inhabitants of the town, in 
their transactions where the name of the town was required, followed 
the name of the post office, Mascoutah, and not the lawful name of 
Muscautah. 



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